Tag Archives: Screencast

Building a searchable UITableView in iOS 9 – Part 3

In this part of our series we’ll take a look at how we actually filter the data that is displayed in the searchable table view. We do that using an NSPredicate.

Check out the first part here, as well as a link to my demo project.

Enjoy!

Watch the full course in one convenient playlist:
Catch this episode on my iOS Dev Diary Podcast:

Building a searchable UITableView in iOS 9 – Part 2

In the previous part we’ve setup our project and the relevant graphical bits to make the app display the table view. Now it’s time to implement the UISearchController object that will be at the heart of letting users sift through our search results. We’ll do that in this part.

Check out the first part here, as well as a link to my demo project.

Enjoy!

Watch the full course in one convenient playlist:
Catch this episode on my iOS Dev Diary Podcast:

Building a searchable UITableView in iOS 9 – Part 1

In this 4 part course I’ll show you how to build a searchable UITableView using iOS 9.1 and Xcode 7.1.

  • Part 1 will talk you through how to build a UITableView with dummy data
  • In Part 2 I’ll show you how to use a UISearchController to display a second table view
  • In Part 3 we’ll discuss how to filter results using an NSPredicate
  • And in Part 4 we’ll see how to communicate those search results to the second table view via KVO.

The whole course is about 50 minutes long, and I’ll explain details step by step. All code is Objective-C, and the the full project I’m building is available on GitHub.

Sounds interesting? Join me now and I’ll see you on the other side 😉

Demo Project

Here’s the code I’ve built during the screencast. As promised, I’ve also implemented the UISearchControllerDelegate methods – just in case you need them:

Further Reading

The Apple Class References aside, I’ve also put together written instructions on how to create this project in my next article. If you prefer written instructions, go check it out here – it covers the same steps as these videos 🙂

Watch the full course in one convenient playlist:
Catch this episode on my iOS Dev Diary Podcast:

How to build a UICollectionView in iOS 8

In this episode I’ll show you how to build a UICollectionView from scratch in Xcode 6. The class is available for both iPhone and iPad since iOS 6. If you know how to build a UITableView then building a UICollectionView will be familiar to you.

I’ll start with a single view application, delete the ViewController class and start fresh with a UICollectionViewController. Next I’ll add a custom class for the UICollectionViewController and UICollectionViewCell and then we’ll hook it up in the storyboard.

By the end we’ll have a simple Collection View App which allows multiple selections. I’m going to use this project to build on with other features in the future.

Custom CollectionViewController Class

The template provides a few good starting points, but they need to be changed to work. First there’s the cell’s reuse identifier, conveniently added as a static at the top of the implementation file. It’s there so we only need to change this once in the file. Replace it with your own, and remember to make the same change in the storyboard:

Screen Shot 2015-02-03 at 11.11.03

Next up is the viewDidLoad method. To make dequeuing cells easier, Apple have provided a registerClass method. If you don’t add your custom cell here, nothing will appear when you run the app. I found that simply commenting out the line works just as well.

The reason they provide this is so that the dequeueCellWithIdendifier method knows which custom cell class to instantiate (prior to iOS 6 it returned nil, but that check is no longer necessary).

I’m also adding multiple selections here, something that cannot be done in the storyboard.

UICollectionViewDataSource

Much like with UITableViews, we need to provide the number of sections, as well as the number of items in each section:

If you don’t provide the sections method, it is assumed that you have one section. Usually we’d have some data and would return a count of how many items we have rather than fixed values here.

We also need to provide what’s in each cell. Here we can add data to labels, populate UIImageViews and many other things our collection view cells may need:

UICollectionViewCell

With UITableViews there were four styles of table cells we could choose from out of the box. A collection view cell on the other hand is completely blank, and we’re expected to provide everything inside it. This means we need a custom UICollectionViewCell class for our project.

Anything we drag into the prototype cell in the storyboard can be hooked up to that custom class and the configured in the above cellForItemAtIndexPath method. Make sure any outlets are defined in the cell’s header file.

Cell Selections

Collection view cells have several views layered on top of each other. At the bottom is the backgroundView and the selectedBackgroundView. These are not configured by default, but if we add our own views here, the cell knows how display selections.

Above the background/selectedBackgroundView is the contentView, and on top of the contentView is where we can add out own outlets (like labels and images). If we leave the contentView’s background colour transparent, the views underneath will be visible, and hence selections are visible too.

Here’s how to configure our custom cell with two colours for selection and deselection. I’m doing this in awakeFromNib, which is called as soon as our cell is instantiated:

Demo Project

The code I’m writing here is available as a demo project on GitHub:

Watch the full course in one convenient playlist:
Catch this episode on my iOS Dev Diary Podcast:

How to create an Unwind Segue in iOS 8

The Unwind Segue was introduced in iOS 6 to make retrieving data from a dismissed view controller easier. A regular Segue allows us to send data from one view controller to another, but it’s not easy to bring data back if the user has changed or added details in that view controller. That’s where an Unwind Segue comes in.

Part 1: Code

Here’s how to create one. I’m assuming we have two view controllers at our disposal, ViewController1 has initiated a standard segue, maybe passing some data. The user then changes the data, and upon saving the data, ViewController2 is dismissed and we’re going back to ViewController1.

So in ViewController1 we’ll add a method we can use as an Unwind Segue, which we later hook up in the storyboard to the Exit object. Here’s that method:

It doesn’t matter what the method is called, just as long as it resides in ViewController1, in which you’ve imported the ViewController2.h file. What DOES matter however that our method is an IBAction and takes a UIStoryboardSegue as a parameter – otherwise Interface builder won’t recognise it, and you won’t be able to drag to the Exit object later.

Meanwhile, in ViewController2, we can make use of the following method which is often provided as a stub in new view controller classes:

prepareForSegue is called just before the unwind segue (or any segue for that matter) is about to begin. You may want to read out a text field or any other values and add it to the object or variable that ViewController1 needs access to.

Part 2: Hooking up the Storyboard

With our code in place, control-drag from the button you’d like to use for initiating the segue. You can hook up multiple buttons to the same unwind segue.

Control-drag each button to the Exit object (in ViewController2):

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 12.00.49

As soon as the button is pressed, the unwind code in ViewController1 is executed and ViewController2 is dismissed.

Demo Project

I’ve put together a quick demo project on GitHub which is the code I’m creating the screencast above:

Further Reading

Watch the full course in one convenient playlist:
Catch this episode on my iOS Dev Diary Podcast:

Creating Multiple In-App Purchases in iOS

In this screencast I’ll show you how to create multiple in-app purchases in you iOS app. The first part is a quick overview, and the second part shows how I’m tinkering with the code (members only).

This is based on an earlier tutorial in which I’m explaining how to create a single in-app purchase – if you’d like to follow along, you can find it here:

In a nutshell we’ll duplicate the earlier Shop class, add our new product identifier and amend the StoreKit observer method, as well as the alertView so that it can unlock the correct product.

The source code for this project is available on GitHub: the master branch is the earlier tutorial with a single product, and the Multi-IAP branch is what’s shown in this video.

This content is for members only.